Surf™ | Concrete Surface Resistivity

Concrete Surface Resistivity

Giatec Surf™ is a laboratory test device for rapid, easy and accurate measurement of the surface electrical resistivity of concrete based on the four-probe (Wenner-Array) technique. The Surf™ patented technology automatically measures resistivity around the concrete specimen using four channels of 4-probe array (located at 90° from each other). The PC software generates the required reports according to the standard specifications.

Surf™ can be used to determine the chloride permeability of concrete in accordance with AASHTO TP95 and the upcoming ASTM standard. The measurement data can be used for durability-based quality control of concrete as well as the service life design of concrete structures

Surf™ PC Software Tutorial Surf_Surface_Electrical_Resistivity_1 Surf™ | Automatic Surface Resistivity Measurement Surf™ | Patented Technology Surf™ | Hand-held probe accessory for surface concrete resistivity Surf™ | Automatic Report Generation Surf™ | 4-channel 4-probe surface electrical resistivity

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle Applications

The electrical resistivity of concrete is correlated well with important durability parameters such as permeability, diffusivity and in general the micro-structure characteristics of concrete. It is a fast and easy method of quality control during new construction.

Surf™ is a unique device for automatic 4-channel resistivity measurement suitable for investigating the micro-structural properties of concrete including:

  • Durability-based quality control of concrete
  • Diffusion of chloride in concrete
  • Setting time of fresh concrete
  • Crack detection in concrete
  • Water content in fresh concrete

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle Features

  • Patented technology
  • The only device in the market fully compliant with both AASHTO T95 and the upcoming ASTM standard
  • Easy to use (see demo on Youtube)
  • Variable frequency (13 - 100 Hz)
  • Wide resistivity range (0.1 - 1,000 kΩ.cm)
  • Fast measurement (8 measurements < 15s)
  • Four-channel four-probe measurement
  • Limiting moisture loss
  • Automatic report generation with PC software
  • Fresh concrete testing/crack detection applications
  • Continuous measurement mode
  • USB connection to computer

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle Standardization

AASHTO TP 95-11 provides the test standard for surface electrical resistivity measurement. An ASTM standard is also under development for this test. A copy of the AASHTO test specification entitled "Standard Method of Test for Surface Resistivity Indication of Concrete's Ability to Resist Chloride Ion Penetration" can be obtained from here.

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle Technical Specifications

General
Reading Range Frequency range Accuracy
0.1 – 100 KΩ.cm 13 – 100 Hz ± (0.1+1%)
100 – 1000 KΩ.cm 13 – 100 Hz ± (1+1%)


Measurement Time
Frequency Single measurement time Testing time (8 measurements)
13 – 100 Hz 1.5 seconds <15 seconds


Operating conditions
Type Value
Operating temperature 15 ~ 45 °C
Operating humidity 30 ~ 80%
Storage temperature 0 ~ 60°C
Operating voltage/current 100-250 V ± 10%, 60Hz
Dimensions of Surf™ 200 x 160 x 70 mm

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle Purchase Items

Part No. Item Description
900107 Surf™ - Comprehensive Package Surf™ unit, 100x200 mm (4"x8") Sample holder, Power adaptor, USB cable, PC Communication software, User manual, Conductive gel, Verification kit, Additional Set of conductive pads, Hand-held probe
900037 Surf™ - D100 Full Package Surf™ unit, 100x200 mm (4"x8") Sample holder, Power adaptor, USB cable, Communication software, User manual, Conductive gel, Verification kit, Additional Set of conductive pads
900030 Surf™ Device Surf™ unit, Power adaptor, USB cable, Communication software, User manual, Verification kit

The following replacement parts and accessories are available upon request:

Part No. Item Description
900100 Hand-held Probe For measurement of surface electrical resistivity on flat surfaces of large concrete samples/elements
900031 Surface Sample holder-D100 100x200 mm (4"x8") sample size, Conductive gel, Additional Set of conductive pads
900032 Verification Kit High and low range dongles to verify the performance of the device
900038 Conductive Gel - High Viscosity 250 ml bottle
900033 Test Cable Four-point connection cable with alligator clip
900034 Contact Sponge Set 16 pcs

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle FAQ

Q1: Is it required to use wet sponges for resistivity measurement using Surf™?
A: If you are testing saturated surface dry specimens (SSD condition), there is no need to use wet sponges. But, for dry specimens, you have to use either wet sponges on the connection tips or the conductive gel provided with the device.

Q2: How does Surf™ take measurements faster?
A: Giatec Surf™ utilizes a patented technology to automatically measure the surface resistivity 8 times around the cylindrical concrete specimen using its four channels of 4-probe arrays. The PC software then generates the required reports according to the standard specifications.

Q3: Can Surf™ be used for field tests on hardened concrete, or is it just for laboratory use?
A: The current version of Surf™ has been designed for laboratory applications in the durability-based quality control of concrete. An accessory is under development for Surf™ that enables this device for field applications as well.

Q4: How can I use Surf™ for other applications?
A: The four input channels of Surf™ device can be connected to accessory cables for customization of test-setup for surface resistivity measurement from the surface of concrete elements (e.g. crack detection under load) or be embedded in fresh and hardened concrete for the monitoring of setting and moisture transport, respectively. Giatec's scientific team will be happy to assist you with your particular research project application.

remove_circle_outlineadd_circle Publications

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